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Brazil Diamond NY2 Santo

<p>The NY2 designation assures us that there are no more than 4 visible beans with defects in a 200 gram sample. This small number of defects would be unnoticeable in most cups, ensuring a consistent and delicious flavour. This bean is screen 17/18, which is the second-largest possible bean size. The large, consistent beans are between 6.75 and 7 millimetres. This small variation among beans makes it easier to roast all beans to the same level. </p> <p>Screen sizing is part of the final milling process in preparation for bagging and export. Milled green coffee is introduced to a large machine composed of multi-tiered tables, each with a ‘screen’, that sit on top of one another. In Brazil, the first screen has wires slightly less than 8 millimetres apart. When green coffee enters the machine, the tables vibrate, and all beans smaller than 8 millimetres fall through the screen to the next screen. This next screen size is slightly smaller than the previous and again, beans are shaken until all the smaller ones fall through. This process is repeated several times until the smallest size, 5.5 millimetres is reached. Beans are separated and graded according to the screen they did not fall through. Using this method, processors can achieve greater consistency in size and make roasting easier. </p> <p>Finally, “ss” stands for “strictly soft” which means that the cup is stable and clean.</p> <h2>Cooperativa Cooxupé</h2> <p>Cooxupé has a long history in Brazil. It was founded in 1932 as a cooperative that provided agricultural credit. In 1957, Cooxupé developed into the Regional Coffee Growers’ Cooperative of Guaxupé. After their redesign the cooperative began buying, milling and selling coffee to an international market. With over 60 years of experience in the national and international sector, Cooxupé is a standard in the Brazilian coffee industry. </p> <p>Today, they sell their coffee to companies in more than 40 countries. They represent approximately 12,000 members. Their producers work in Sul de Minas and Cerrado in the Minas Gerais region as well as growers in the Rio Pardo Valley in São Paulo. Ninety-seven percent of those members are small-scale farming families. For these members, they own small plots of land and coffee production is their main source of income, so receiving remunerative prices is vital to their continued livelihoods. </p> <p>
As a big player in coffee in Brazil, Cooxupé takes their social responsibility towards their members seriously. In the rural areas where the cooperative works they have developed health and scholarship programs and provided education and agricultural training. In these trainings, they put a lot of focus on future generations of coffee farmers and building sustainable farming systems. </p> <p>
An extremely successful program of theirs, called Escola Consciente, won the Andef Award in 2014. The Andef Award is considered one of the most important awards in Brazilian agriculture. </p> <p>
Cooxupé continues to utilise their size to make a difference. In 2013 they launched the Environmental Education Center to help reduce the impact of farming by encouraging future generations of farmers to be even more eco-conscious. </p> <h2>Coffee in Brazil</h2> <p>About 40% of all coffee in the world is produced in Brazil - nearly 3.6 million metric tons annually. With so much coffee produced, it’s no wonder that the country produces a wide range of qualities. Brazil produces everything from natural Robusta, to the neutral and mild Santos screen 17/18, to the distinctive Rio Minas 17/18. In recent years, Brazilian producers have also begun investing more heavily in specialty coffee production. Through our in-country partners in Brazil, including our sister company, we are able to provide a wide range of Brazilian coffees to our clients: from macrolot to microlot.</p> <p>Today, the most prolific coffee growing regions of Brazil are Espirito Santo, São Paulo, Minas Gerais, and Bahia. Most Brazilian coffee is grown on large farms that are built and equipped for maximizing production output through mechanical harvesting and processing. The relatively flat landscape across many of Brazil’s coffee regions combined with high minimum wages has led most farms to opt for this type of mechanical harvesting over selective hand-picking.</p> <p>In the past, mechanization meant that strip-picking was the norm; however, today’s mechanical harvesters are increasingly sensitive, meaning that farms can harvest only fully ripe cherries at each pass, which is good news for specialty-oriented producers.</p> <p>In many cases and on less level sections of farms, a mixed form of ‘manual mechanized’ harvesting may be used, where ripe coffee is picked using a derriçadeira – a sort of mechanized rake that uses vibration to harvest ripe cherry. A tarp is spanned between coffee trees to capture the cherry as it falls.</p> <p>With the aid of these newer, more selective technologies, there’s a growing number of farms who are increasingly concerned with – and able to deliver - cup quality.</p> <p></p>
Price €5.94

Burundi Yandora

<p>There are 3,193 smallholders living around Kayanza, Burundi who deliver their cherry to Yandaro Central Washing Station (CWS). We are excited to import this coffee from our in-country partner Greenco. In addition to operating 13 washing stations in Burundi and processing excellent coffee, Greenco is also working with communities to increase farmer livelihoods and general equality in coffee producing areas.</p> <p>Yandaro CWS sits close to the border with Rwanda, in the Kayanza province. Both countries share special growing conditions in the corridor that connects the south of Rwanda to the north of Burundi. This region produces many of our favourite coffees both in Rwanda and Burundi.</p> <p>The washing station is in the valley where the eponymous river runs. The growing area around the station benefits from being close to the Kibira Rainforest. A rainforest is a healthy ecosystem that helps maintain groundwater reserves and nutrition in the soil for the region surrounding it. With its closeness to a large river, Yandaro has a very strategic location in a high-potential coffee region.</p> <p>The station serves 3,193 local coffee producers from 22 hills around the station. The average altitude in the area is 1,800m. During the harvest season, Yandaro processes more than 1,200 metric tonnes of coffee. The region has a mild climate with average temperatures between 18 and 25° Celsius, depending on the altitude.</p> <p>Yandaro CWS participates in a number of farmer outreach and support projects include a goat and pig project, Farmer Hub, strengthening cooperatives and distributing fertilizer and coffee trees.</p> <h2>Cultivation</h2> <p>Most coffee trees in Burundi are Red Bourbon, for reasons of quality. Because of the increasingly small size of coffee plantings, aging rootstock is a very big issue in Burundi. Many farmers have trees that are over 50 years old, but with small plots to farm, it is difficult to justify taking trees entirely out of product for the 3-4 years it will take new plantings to begin to yield. In order to encourage farmers to renovate their plantings, Greenco purchases seeds from the Institut des Sciences Agronomiques du Burundi (ISABU), establishes nurseries and sells the seedlings to farmers at or below cost. At the washing station, farmers can also get organic fertilizer from reconverted coffee pulp.</p> <p>Despite the ubiquity of coffee growing in Burundi, each smallholder producers a relatively small harvest. The average smallholder has approximately 250 trees, normally in their backyards. Each tree yields an average of 1.5 kilos of cherry so the average producer sells about 200-300 kilos of cherry annually.</p> <h2>Harvest &amp; Post-Harvest</h2> <p>During the harvest season, all coffee is selectively hand-picked. Most families only have 200 to 250 trees, and harvesting is done almost entirely by the family. Greenco knows that even small distances can be time consuming and expensive to travel for smallholder farmers, and they know that receiving cherry immediately after harvest is crucial to quality.  Therefore, smallholders can bring their cherries either directly to a central washing station (CWS) or to one of the 12 collection sites situated throughout growing areas. Farmers are paid the same for their quality cherry regardless of where they bring their cherries. In this way, farmers are not disadvantaged due to their location and Greenco bears the cost of transport to CWS’s. </p> <p>Quality assurance begins as soon as farmers deliver their cherry. Cherries are wet processed under constant supervision. The pulping, fermentation time, washing, grading in the channels and a final soaking is closely monitored. All cherry is floated in small buckets as a first step to check quality. Greenco still purchases floaters (damaged, underripe, etc) but immediately separates the two qualities and only markets floaters as B-quality cherry. After floating, the higher quality cherry is sorted again by hand to remove all damaged, underripe and overripe cherries. </p> <p>After sorting, cherry is de-pulped within 6 hours of delivery. The machine can process up to 3 tons of cherries per hour. During pulping, cherry is separated into high- and low-grade by density on a Mackinon 3-disc pulper outfitted with an additional separation disk.  The coffee is then fermented in water from a nearby stream for 10-12 hours, depending on ambient temperature. A small sign on the fermentation tank keeps track of each lot. The sign mentions the washing station name, date of cherry purchase, grade of the bean and the time when fermentation began. Trained agronomists check the beans by hand regularly to ensure fermentation is halted at the perfect time. The station workers trample the parchment for 30 minutes in the fermentation tank. This trampling process helps to remove mucilage on the fermented parchment. After this, the parchment is given fresh water to move it into the washing-grading canal, where it is washed.</p> <p>After fermentation is completed, coffee is run through washing and grading canals. As the beans flow through, wooden bars that are laid across the canal prevent beans of specific densities from passing through. These bars are spaced across the channel. While the first blockade stops the most-dense beans, the next is arranged to stop the second most-dense beans and so on. In total, the channel separates beans into seven grades according to density. After washing, this parchment is poured onto wooden trays or nylon bags and carried to the drying tables, each in its separate quality group. Each tray and nylon bag of parchment keeps its traceability tag with all info.</p> <p>The beans are then transported to the drying tables where they will dry slowly for 2-3 weeks. Pickers go over the drying beans for damaged or defective beans that may have been missed in previous quality checks. Usually, each table holds 800kg of parchment. In the peak of the season, the maximum load for a table is 1000kg. Each table has a traceability tag with the lot info. The parchment is left to dry from sunrise to sunset and is covered with a sheet during the evening or when it rains. If the weather conditions are good, the parchment takes on average 10 to 14 days to dry. During this time it is stirred regularly. The moisture level is carefully monitored and any parchment with visual defects is removed. On the table, the beans are dried to 11.5%.</p> <h2>Quality Control at Greenco</h2> <p>The average cherry buying price for Greenco in 2019 was significantly above average. CWSs make the first payment to farmers between 15-30 June. The second payment comes later in the summer. If the coffee wins a competition or sells for extremely high specialty prices, Greenco gives another payment approximately a year after the harvest season.  </p> <p>Once dry, the parchment coffee is then bagged and taken to the warehouse. Greenco’s team of expert cuppers assess every lot (which are separated by station, day and quality) at the lab. The traceability of the station, day and quality is maintained throughout the entire process. </p> <p>Before shipment, coffee is sent to Budeca, Burundi’s largest dry mill. The coffee is milled and then hand sorted by a team of hand-pickers who look closely at every single bean to ensure zero defects. It takes a team of two hand-pickers a full day to look over a single bag. UV lighting is also used on the beans and any beans that glows—usually an indication of a defect—is removed.</p> <p>The mill produces an average of 300 containers of 320 bags per year. Budeca is located in Burundi’s new capital city, Gitega, with a population of around 30,000 people. Since there are approximately 3,000 people working at the mill, mostly as hand pickers, this means that Budeca employs nearly 10% of the total population in Gitega for at least half the year (during the milling season). The same is true in the provinces of Ngozi and Kayanza, where Greenco and Bugestal are the first employers in the region during the coffee harvest season. This has an incalculable impact on a country like Burundi, with unemployment rates above 50%, especially in rural areas and among young people.</p> <h2>About Greenco</h2> <p>Greenco, a company that oversees and structures washing stations in Kayanza province of Burundi, gives washing stations and producers support all along the production chain. They started their work in 2015, and have dominated all Cup of Excellence competitions in Burundi ever since. Currently, Greenco has 13 washing stations all located in Kayanza in the north of Burundi. The producers receive support from the Greenco CWS managers, who are all agronomic engineers. Greenco’s overall impact through these 13 central washing stations (CWS) extends to over 15,210 coffee producing households.</p> <p>Greenco works with young agronomy graduates to provide farmer training and manage washing stations. Young graduates are particularly well suited for the work with Greenco because they can all work with computer systems, greatly simplifying the flow of information between the washing stations and Greenco. Also, they have a fresh and systematic approach to coffee production and processing, with up-to-date knowledge about farming practices. The agronomists received additional training from the NGO Kahawatu Foundation on best agricultural practices (BAP). Off season, they provide agronomy assistance to the roughly 15,210 farmers who deliver cherries to Greenco CWS to prepare for the next harvest.</p> <p>Another socio-economic challenge that Greenco addresses is youth unemployment. The national youth unemployment rate is almost 50%. At Greenco, young graduates receive a decent salary and benefits (house, motorbike, healthcare) as well as real career prospects.</p> <p>Next to improving quality and productivity, Greenco strives to improve socio-economic and environmental conditions around the washing stations. All of their washing stations have UTZ and 4C certification. One of their focus points is building an efficient supply chain around the CWS.  Greenco is buying 93% of its cherries directly from farmers via collection centres. This way, they improve farm-gate price to the producers.</p> <p>In addition to providing training on farming practices, Greenco organises trainings for farmer groups about various social aspects. Coffee families learn about gender equality, financial planning, family planning and more.</p> <p>Environmental stewardship is of paramount importance to Greenco. They have has equipped all washing stations with water treatment facilities and solar panels and batteries. The station has ponds to purify the wastewater from processing before flowing back in the river network. The solar panels provide energy for computers, lighting and smartphones.</p> <h2>Coffee in Burundi</h2> <p>Burundi has long been overlooked in comparison to its neighboring East African specialty coffee producing powerhouses. However, Burundi season, for us, is one of the highlights of the annual coffee calendar. The country’s coffee is produced almost entirely by smallholder farmers, and much of this small-scale production is of exceptional quality. With its super sweet, clean and often floral coffees, Burundi, every year, is increasingly is putting itself on the specialty coffee map. </p> <p>Coffee is of paramount importance to families and the country at large. Considering this, improving and expanding coffee infrastructure is not just a way to improve incomes, it is a way to revolutionize the earning potential of an entire nation.</p> <p>Building washing stations and expanding agricultural extension work can be great ways to improve coffee quality. Washing stations are pivotal in improving cup profile standards and the global reputation of Burundian coffee. </p> <p>Both state-owned and private actors drive Burundi’s coffee industry and play key roles as washing station management companies and exporters. State-owned companies are called Sogestals, short for “Sociétés de Gestions des Stations de Lavage” (Washing station management companies). Privately-owned companies can operate under a variety of different names.</p> <p>Sucafina’s history in Burundi goes back to 2007 when Bucafe/Sucafina Burundi was established in Bujumbura. Through Bucafe, we work with several privately-owned washing station management companies and exporters. Our work bridges the entire supply chain, allowing us to be vertically integrated. Our supply chain is solid, reliable and transparent. Due to this, we are more efficient, able to supply better value and positioned to offer both producers and consumers of Burundian coffee a diversity of expertise.</p> <p></p>
Price €7.74

El Salvador Finca Nazareth

<p>Sundried for 30 days on raised beds using 4 hours daily direct sunlight and using natural shade for the coffee to dry slower in order to have a homogeneous and brighter cup as and end result. They thicken the layers of coffee on a daily bases to create the slow drying process.</p> <p><strong>FINCA DESCRIPTION:</strong></p> <p>Finca Nazareth owned by ANDRES ACOSTA (6th generation), is located in the town of Apaneca, Ahuachapan. The growing conditions at the finca are characterized by the altitude that goes from 1500 to 1650 m, having clay loam soil which is the perfect one to grow coffee and presenting a lot of organic matter that helps the coffee trees to develop better flavors in the cup. Nazareth consists of 4 lots called: ‘Casco de Finca’, ‘El Amate’, ‘Bavaria’ and ‘Sintegual’.</p> <p>At Nazareth they grow Pacamara, Bourbon, Yellow Caturra and SL-34 varieties with bourbon being the main one. </p> <p><strong>REGION: </strong>apaneca, ahuachapan</p> <p><strong>LOT:</strong> ‘bournbon - natural' (shg - 0-5 defects, screen 15)</p> <p><strong>HARVEST PERIOD/DATE:</strong> decenber 2019- match 2020</p> <p><strong>PICKING ROUND:</strong> round 2 and 3 (out of 4rounds)</p>
Price €9.62

Ethiopie Jimma-Musa

<p>Thanks to the Bashasha Project, producer Khalid Kemal has been able to export and sell his coffee under his own name. This Natural lot shows what his labor has achieved.</p> <p>Producer Khalid Kemal used to sell his coffee to local private traders but with the new laws, he is able to sell his coffee directly to importers, garnering higher profits. Based on our calculations and local market conditions in 2018/2019, the farmers, like Khalid, who participated in this supply chain model gained up to 25% more than others in the Djimma area.</p> <h2>Cultivation</h2> <p>Khalid’s farm is 16 hectares with over 3,000 trees per hectare. Many of the methods he uses are organic by default, as agricultural inputs have historically been hard to access.</p> <h2>Harvest &amp; Post-Harvest</h2> <p>Cherry is selectively handpicked. He processes both washed and natural coffees on the farm. Natural coffees are immediately laid to dry on drying beds. Drying cherry is turned regularly to ensure even drying. It takes approximately 10 to 15 days for the cherry to reach 11-12% moisture content. Once dry, cherry is rested and then sent to a dry mill to be prepared for export.</p> <h2>Changes to the ECX</h2> <p>Due to recent changes in regulation, even the little guys can directly export their coffee to foreign markets. With Ethiopia’s staggering levels of varietal diversity, we believe that amazing new coffees are just waiting to be discovered. </p> <p>The Ethiopian Commodity Exchange (ECX) was established in 2008 as a way to help farmers receive higher prices, get paid more quickly and receive better payment for better quality. To accomplish these goals, the ECX was intentionally designed to semi-anonymize coffees so that those who graded and those who purchased the coffees, did so on the merit of the cup, not the reputation of the name.  </p> <p>In response to the demand for more traceable coffee, the Ethiopian Coffee &amp; Tea Development and Marketing Authority introduced a bill in 2017 that allowed Ethiopian coffee, including coffee sold through the ECX, to be marketed and sold with full traceability. </p> <h2>About Bashasha Smallholders</h2> <p>Most importantly for our Bashasha Coffees, the 2017 changes to the ECX regulations also gave farmers a chance to apply for export licenses. With these export licenses, farmers can now process, market and export their coffee directly. This system places an emphasis on preserving traceability for each producers’ lots throughout the supply chain. It also means that farmers have more choice and more control over the price they receive. Finally, it provides incentives for farmers who are geared towards quality, benefitting all actors in the supply chain.  </p> <p>These new laws are giving us a unique opportunity to increase our traceability all while supporting great coffee farmers. We’ve partnered with farmers in Bashasha, a small town in the Agaro Zone of Western Ethiopia, to bring you a selection of Naturals and Fully washed coffees that can be traced all the way to the farmers themselves.</p> <h2>About Agaro</h2> <p>Agaro is well known for producing some of the most well-known cooperative coffees of the past decade via the Duromina, Biftu Gudina, Yukro, and Hunda Oli cooperatives.  </p> <p>The majority of coffees grown in Agaro are local landrace varieties (which are often also called Ethiopian heirloom). Other varieties grown in the region were developed by the Jimma Agricultural Research Centre (JARC). JARC is an important research center for Ethiopia and has done a great deal of work on developing disease resistant and high yielding varieties that still demonstrate quality in the cup. </p> <p>Most farmers in the region farm on fewer than 5 hectares (many counting their coffee farms in terms of trees rather than area). Cultivation methods are traditional for the most part, with coffee being grown as part of an integrated ‘coffee garden,’ intercropped with other food crops. </p> <h2>Coffee in Ethiopia</h2> <p>While Ethiopia is famous as coffee’s birthplace, today it remains a specialty coffee industry darling for its incredible variety of flavors. While full traceability has been difficult in recent history, new regulations have made direct purchasing possible. Our importer is working in partnering directly with farmers to help them produce top quality specialty lots that are now completely traceable, adding value for farmers and roasters, alike.</p> <p>The exceptional quality of Ethiopian coffee is due to a combination of factors. The genetic diversity of coffee varieties means that we find a diversity of flavor, even between (or within) farms with similar growing conditions and processing. In addition to varieties, processing methods also contribute to end quality. The final key ingredients for excellent coffee in Ethiopia are the producing traditions that have created the genetic diversity, processing infrastructure and great coffee we enjoy today.</p> <p>Most producers in Ethiopia are smallholders, and the majority continue to cultivate coffee using traditional methods. As a result, most coffee is grown with no chemical fertilizer or pesticide use. Coffee is almost entirely cultivated, harvested and dried using manual systems.</p> <p></p>
Price €7.74

Ethiopie Sidamo 2

<p>Sidamo coffees have a profound complexity that many attribute to the diversity of local landrace varieties. This coffee, produced by smallholders and processed at washing stations, preserves the depth and breadth of flavor. </p> <p>The Sidamo region of Southern Ethiopia holds the distinction as one of the three trademarked coffee regions of Ethiopia. Alongside Harrar and Yirgacheffe, Sidamo holds a Designation of Origin for coffee grown in the region. That's unsurprising when you consider the high altitudes of 1,550 to 2,200 meters above sea level, plentiful rainfall and fertile soil that makes the coffee grown in this region so remarkable.  </p> <p>The Sidamo region is named after the indigenous ethnic group, the Sidama, who call the region their home. On Sidamo’s Eastern border lies the large regions of Arsi and Bale while to the West, Sidamo is bordered by Gamogofa.  </p> <p>Sidamo lies in the path of the Great Rift Valley and thanks to this, the countryside of Sidamo is lush and green. There are several freshwater lakes that provide drinking and agricultural water and account for the densely populated nature of this region. </p> <p>The Great Rift Valley spans from the northernmost tip of Ethiopia across Kenya and all the way to the southernmost region of Tanzania. It is home to some of the oldest-known fossils of humankind, which suggests its importance in the early development of humanity. </p> <h2>Cultivation</h2> <p>Many would say that the strength of Sidamo coffees lie in the regions’ diversity of profiles. The many microclimates and varying soil types lead to striking differences from town to town. But across all Sidamo coffees is a profound complexity that many attribute to the diversity of local landrace varieties. Varieties can differ from town to town and even farm to farm where each farmer may have more than one unique varieties seldom or never found outside their plot.  </p> <p>When all these different varieties are blended at the local cooperative, the resulting blend expresses the complexity of the plant genetics in the area.  </p> <p>Sidamo coffees are distinguished with three markings: a grade, a geographical letter designation and an indication of whether it is washed or unwashed. In addition to their geographical indications, subsequent markings may be added to convey quality and other information.   </p> <p>Farming methods in Sidamo remain largely traditional. Sidamo farmers typically intercrop their coffee plants with other food crops. This method is common among smallholders because it maximises land use and provides food for their families.  </p> <p>In addition to remaining traditionally intercropped, most farms are also traditional and organic-by-default. Farmers in Sidamo typically use very few—if any—fertilisers or pesticides. Most farm work is done manually and very few tasks are mechanized, even during processing. </p> <p></p> <h2>Harvest &amp; Post-Harvest</h2> <p>Due to the size of most plots, coffee is typically handpicked by landowners and their family. </p> <p>All coffee is selectively hand-harvested before being delivered to a collection center or directly to the washing station. At the washing station, coffee is sorted to remove damaged or underripe cherry and is then delivered to the pulpers to be pulped. It will then be fermented for around 24 hours, depending on the weather conditions.  </p> <p>Once fermentation is complete the parchment is thoroughly washed and is then graded in washing channels, separating each lot into two grades based on density. Once graded, the coffee is sometimes soaked under clean spring water in tanks for 12-24 hours to remove all traces of fermented mucilage. </p> <p>After washing, the coffee is delivered to raised beds to dry under shade for 10-14 days until moisture content reaches 12%. During this time, the coffee is regularly turned and hand sorted several times to remove any damaged or discolored beans. Coffee is covered with plastic during the hottest hours of the day to protect the parchment from drying too quickly and overnight to prevent condensation from seeping into the drying parchment. This level of labor and love result in a truly exquisite cup profile. </p> <h2>Grade 2</h2> <p>In the Ethiopian grading system, grade 2 refers to the cup quality as well as physical quality of a coffee. A grade 2 allows between four and 13 full defects per 300gr green sample. The cup typically has fruity and clean characteristics, without any off-flavors.  </p> <p>Ethiopia Sidamo 2 is a classic in every coffee range and especially popular in blends. The cup quality can be very surprising for prices well below the grade 1 price point. For us, grade 2 coffee typically sits around an 83-84 cup score. </p> <h2>Coffee in Ethiopia</h2> <p>While Ethiopia is famous as coffee’s birthplace, today it remains a specialty coffee industry darling for its incredible variety of flavors. While full traceability has been difficult in recent history, new regulations have made direct purchasing possible. Our importer is connected directly with farmers to help them produce top quality specialty lots that are now completely traceable, adding value for farmers and roasters, alike.</p> <p>The exceptional quality of Ethiopian coffee is due to a combination of factors. The genetic diversity of coffee varieties means that we find a diversity of flavor, even between (or within) farms with similar growing conditions and processing. In addition to varieties, processing methods also contribute to end quality. The final key ingredients for excellent coffee in Ethiopia are the producing traditions that have created the genetic diversity, processing infrastructure and great coffee we enjoy today.</p> <p>Most producers in Ethiopia are smallholders, and the majority continue to cultivate coffee using traditional methods. As a result, most coffee is grown with no chemical fertilizer or pesticide use. Coffee is almost entirely cultivated, harvested and dried using </p> <p></p>
Price €7.36

Guatemala Finca El Limonar...

<p>Finca El Limonar was established in 1909 at La Libertad - Huehuetenango and owned by Rosa Maria Ovalle viuda de Aguirre since 1983. This beautiful located finca, close to the Rio El Injerto, is managed by her son Rogelio Aguirre with a lot of care. At high altitude, and close to the Mexican border, the following varieties are grown: bourbon, caturra, mundo novo, pacamara and marago.</p> <p>Over the last years the hard work conducted at El Limonar gained them the appreciation of the COE jury-members that ranked them on a very nice 7the place in 2013, a 15th place in 2014 and yet another fine 17th place in 2018. </p> <p>In 2018 they invested in more African beds to dry the coffee and in 2019 they also built greenhouses to dry the coffee more evenly. Furthermore a first experiment with a natural processing was conducted. Due to the good result Rogelio continued with it in 2020. All of these actions and investments look very promising. Hence we are looking forward to more fantastic coffees from El Limonar.</p> <p><strong>LOT DESCRIPTION:</strong></p> <p>This ‘La Cipresada’ micro-lot is a 100% Caturra selection from the highest part of the farm. </p> <p><strong>REGION:</strong> huehutenango</p> <p><strong>LOT:</strong> 'la cipresada' micro-lot (shb-ep)</p> <p><strong>HARVEST PERIOD:</strong> Mid-harvest: February-March 2020</p> <p><strong>PACKAGING TYPE &amp; SIZE:</strong> 30kg box with 2 vacuum bags (2 x 15kg)</p>
Price €8.58

Guatemala Finca Pampojila

<p>Finca Pampojila is located south of the village of San Lucas Toliman on the southside of the stunning Lake Atitlan. The farm was established back in 1850 and since 2012 owned by Alex Herrera (Agropecuaria Atitlan SA). Almost half of the finca is used to grow coffee and the other half is wild forest.</p> <p>Over the last years the finca has been renovated and that process continues in the next years. The part of the farm that we selected this lot from was renovated in 2013.</p> <p>After visiting the farm a couple of times over the last years we finally started collaborating in 2019. We are pleased with the hard work conducted and the consistent fine Atitlan coffee they produce year after year (multiple regional gold medals in ANACAFE’s regional contest confirm our cuppings). </p> <p><strong>LOT DESCRIPTION:</strong>This specific lot is a 100% Caturra selection (120 bags of 69kg) from the ‘San Julian’ spot on the farm. REGION: SOLOLA (LAKE ATITLAN)</p> <p><strong>HARVEST PERIOD:</strong>Dec 2019 - Jan 2020</p> <p><strong>REGION:</strong> solola (lake atiltlan)</p> <p><strong>LOT: </strong>san julian' micr-lot (shb - ep)</p> <p></p> <p><strong>PACKAGING TYPE &amp; SIZE:</strong>46kg JUTE BAG + GP</p>
Price €7.92

Honduras Cerro Bueno Organic

<h2>Honduras Cerro Bueno</h2> <p>This Fully washed coffee from Cerro Bueno estate bears the Café Marcala Denomination of Origin, the first of its kind in Central America and it’s easy to see why.</p> <p>Cerro Bueno Estate focuses on growing high quality coffee at 1,550 meters above sea level in the Montecillos mountain range. The estate has the Café Marcala Denomination of Origin, the first of its kind in Central America. </p> <h2>Cultivation</h2> <p>Coffee is shade grown using species that will protect and renew the environment and local wildlife populations.  </p> <p>This coffee is also Organic, which means that it was grown without the use of any artificial fertilizers or pesticides. Organic farming can also include ecologically-focus farming method that aim to reduce erosion, increase irrigation and improve overall soil health. With the help of an organic certification, producers receive higher prices and they, their families and any workers on their farm are not exposed to dangerous chemicals. Fewer chemicals used on a farm also means less run off and fewer chemicals finding their way into our global water systems.</p> <h2>Harvest &amp; Post-Harvest</h2> <p>At Cerro Bueno, coffee is selectively handpicked and then pulped using an ecopulper. After a dry fermentation, parchment is washed in clean water and then mechanically dried for 36 hours.  </p> <p>Dried parchment is then bagged in GrainPro and stored in a warehouse for 1 month. After resting, parchment is transported to San Pedro Sula in Cortes, to the CADEXSA ('Cafe de Exportacion SA) dry mill. </p> <h2>Coffee in Honduras</h2> <p>Honduras is a small yet mighty coffee producer. The country boasts the largest per capita coffee production in the world. Beginning in 2017, Honduras began placing in third place for Arabica production volume globally. For this slot, they compete with Ethiopia—a country 10 times larger than Honduras.  The two countries trade between third and fourth place annually, but the achievement is impressive, nonetheless.</p> <p>Honduras has everything it needs to become a premier specialty coffee producer. The country has the right growing conditions, abundant fertile soils and soaring altitudes (nearly all farms are at more than 1,000 meters above sea level), plus a variety of microclimates.</p> <p>Beginning in the early 2000s the industry began to focus on quality. Improved infrastructure (better mechanical dryers, centralized wet mills, an increasing number of solar dryers), quality control/assurance trainings (separating lots by qualities, cupping schools, etc.), the rise of specialty-focused exporters, increased volumes of certified coffees and the strengthening cooperative movement all have worked in tandem to make Honduran coffee ‘one to watch’.</p> <p>It is only in more recent years that coffee production in Honduras has reached specialty levels comparable to other Central American countries, but specialty roasters are responding with enthusiasm. In 2017, a lot in the Cup of Excellence garnered the highest price ever paid for a Cup of Excellence coffee in any country: $124.50 per pound (approximately $56.50 per kg).</p> <p>Above all, while Honduras increasingly offers high end microlots, what the country arguably represents overall is exceptional value. Quality has improved massively over the last 15 years, and in addition to unique specialty lots, the country offers very solid, clean blenders at very attractive prices.</p> <p></p>
Price €6.70

Nicaragua Finca El Limoncillo

<p>Nicaragua is a rather new country within specialty coffee. Political, economic and also environmental (e.g. hurricanes) disturbances and instabilities kept the country from moving into the specialty market any quicker. The pioneering work of some families, like the Mierisch family, with a clear vision on producing quality coffee supported by e.g. the Cup of Excellence annual competition created the necessary awareness for growing specialty coffee among Nicaraguan coffee farmers.</p> <p>The Mierisch family owns a couple of excellent farms in the Matagalpa and Jinotega departments and runs their own dry-mill ‘Don Esteban’. Finca El Limoncillo is located in the Matagalpa department, in a town called La Dalia. The farm is named after the Limoncillo (a small type of lemon) that was already growing on the farm when it was purchased in 1930 by the Mierisch family making it the 2nd oldest coffee farm in the family (Los Placeres is 1st). Typica was the sole varietal grown on the farm up until the mid-1990’s, but due to climate change, unstable market pricing, and vulnerability to coffee leaf rust the Mierisch family decided to diversify the varietals and also focus extensively on quality over quantity. Harvest season goes from October to January at the farm where coffee grows between 850 and 1110m. The farms has a clay loam soil type and Eucalyptus is the main shade tree. The farm has its own wet-mill and produces washed coffee but also pulped naturals and naturals. The farm won a nice 2nd place at the Cup Of Excellence 2008 with a washed Javanica.</p> <p>The excitement of our first visit to Nicaragua in 2018 (enlarged by another of our partners, the Balladarez family, winning the Cup of Excellence on the night we left) came to an abrupt end only a few weeks later (April 2018) when student protest against the Ortega regime escalated and in the weeks and months that followed hundreds of people were killed and many others jailed. Again a very confusing and sad chapter in Nicaragua’s history. Not only from a human point of view but it also created (again) hard times for coffee producers as the economic stability disappeared too. A few months after the outbreak of the protest the situation slowly improved but still to this day is very uncertain. Due to the many safety issues there was no COE-competition this year. The situation also caused us to check and double-check with the Mierisch famly as well as the Balladarez family to hear from them they were doing fine and if our 2019 visit would be safe. We decided to visit both of them again and I was glad to be welcomed by Erwin Mierisch at the airport and to see he was doing fine.</p> <p>During my second visit (2019) I cupped many coffees and experiments at the Mierisch coffee lab and selected two fine lots.</p> <p><strong>LOT DESCRIPTION:</strong></p> <p>This specific lot (n°1909) from a plot called ‘Bochinche’ at Finca El Limoncillo consists of 25 bags (69kg). The coffee cherries were depulped leaving as much fruit flesh on as possible (pulped natural) and transported to the dry-mill where they were put into air-tight barrels to start the ‘anaerobic’ fermentation (simply stated: fermentation without the presence of oxygen). The barrels were kept inside the warehouse at a temperature of around 24 degrees Celsius for 48 hours. After that the barrels were opened and the coffee was spread out on the patio for 4 days of drying in the full sun (to make sure the fruit flesh is dried properly). Next they were moved to a greenhouse where they dried another 14 days on African (raised) beds. </p> <p><strong>REGION:</strong> matagalpa</p> <p><strong>LOT:</strong> 'javanica - pulped natural anaerobic-micro-lot (shb - ep)</p>
Price €9.25
Peru Jumarp Organic &...
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Peru Jumarp Organic &...

<p></p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="text-align:center;line-height:normal;" align="center"><b><span style="font-size:24pt;font-family:'Times New Roman', serif;" lang="en-gb" xml:lang="en-gb">Peru Jumarp Organic</span></b></p> <p></p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="line-height:normal;"><b><span style="font-size:24pt;font-family:'Times New Roman', serif;" lang="en-gb" xml:lang="en-gb"> </span></b></p> <p></p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="line-height:normal;"><b><span style="font-size:24pt;font-family:'Times New Roman', serif;" lang="en-gb" xml:lang="en-gb">JUMARP Mujeres Organic </span></b></p> <p></p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="line-height:normal;"><span style="font-size:12pt;font-family:'Times New Roman', serif;" lang="en-gb" xml:lang="en-gb">JUMARP (Asociación de Productores Cafetaleros Juan Marco El Palto) is doing extraordinary work revolutionizing coffee production in rural Peru. We are particularly proud to support one of their innovative projects. The El Palto Mujeres program supports gender equity in the community. This certified Organic lot was produced by several Mujeres program members, all of whom are—fittingly—women.</span></p> <p></p> <p><span lang="en-gb" xml:lang="en-gb">The Asociación de Productores Cafetaleros Juan Marco "El Palto" – in short, JUMARP – was founded in 2003 by José Carranza Barboza and 35 other smallholder farmers. The association was born out of a desire to develop a new, producer-focused model for growing and exporting coffee.</span></p> <p></p> <p><span lang="en-gb" xml:lang="en-gb">The cooperative noticed that women were typically only involved in the cooperative peripherally and even more rarely involved in decision making. To address this, JUMARP created the Mujeres program—named for the Spanish word for women. The program works to improve social and economic standing for women members.</span></p> <p></p> <p><span lang="en-gb" xml:lang="en-gb">To increase women’s participation, they began by identifying barriers to women’s active participation and then started implementing steps to help women get more involved. The Mujeres program helps women develop their skills in decision making, leadership, entrepreneurial management and teamwork. They also focus on bolstering self-esteem so women have the confidence to share their new skills in public settings and around men. Participants also receive sensory training and learn to roast to help them sell their roasted coffee at a local market and to gain a better understanding of quality.</span></p> <p></p> <p><span lang="en-gb" xml:lang="en-gb">Across Peru, most smallholder producers use a similar household-based model of production. Farm sizes are small, and most families pitch in together to contribute the work needed – from pruning, to weeding, to fertilizing - to bring in a successful coffee harvest.</span></p> <p></p> <p><span lang="en-gb" xml:lang="en-gb">Women are often significant contributors to household coffee production, but their labor is frequently overlooked, which the Mujeres Program is working to change.</span></p> <p></p> <p><span lang="en-gb" xml:lang="en-gb">During the harvest season, coffee is selectively handpicked. This labor-intensive process usually involves the entire family. Some larger farms may hire local day laborers to help with harvest.</span></p> <p></p> <p><span lang="en-gb" xml:lang="en-gb">After harvesting, cherry is often hand-sorted to remove damaged or underripe cherries and is sometimes (depending on the family’s processing setup) floated in buckets or plastic vats to remove underweights. After sorting, the cherry is pulped. Most families have a mechanical or manual drum pulper located on their farm, usually close to the house.</span></p> <p></p> <p><span lang="en-gb" xml:lang="en-gb">Once pulped, coffee is fermented in a tank for at least 18 and up to 40 hours depending on the climate (higher altitudes often require longer fermentation times due to cooler air temperatures). After fermenting, parchment is washed in clean water.</span></p> <p></p> <p><span lang="en-gb" xml:lang="en-gb">Drying infrastructure varies greatly in Peru. Some farmers use covered raised beds and others have a ‘carpa solar’ – a raised drying room, often above a storage shed or even their home.</span></p> <p></p> <p><span lang="en-gb" xml:lang="en-gb">Parchment will dry for around 20 days on average and, no matter the drying method, will be turned regularly to ensure even drying.</span></p> <p></p> <p><span lang="en-gb" xml:lang="en-gb">Every year, we commit to buying several containers from JUMARP. We believe in the mission of the cooperative and want to support them in the fantastic work they are doing to increase coffee quality, spread organic farming practices and strengthen gender equality in their communities.</span></p> <p></p> <p><span lang="en-gb" xml:lang="en-gb">We are committed to buying JUMARP’s coffees through thick and thin, even when harvests are difficult. As a result, JUMARP members are able to depend on a certain level of income from their coffee year in and year out. This dependable income help ensure the longevity of their coffee quality and community improvement projects.</span></p> <p></p> <p><span lang="en-gb" xml:lang="en-gb">All 188 members produce certified organic and Fairtrade coffee. The cooperative invests the premiums received from these certifications in a number of important community projects, including crop renovations, a fund for education programs and the construction of schools.</span></p> <p></p> <p><span lang="en-gb" xml:lang="en-gb">We’re proud to support their carbon capture agroforestry project. Working with 3 other cooperatives and Café Selva Norte, JUMARP members use sustainable agroforestry techniques to protect the environment while improving coffee quality and yield.</span></p> <p></p> <p><span lang="en-gb" xml:lang="en-gb">Their ambitious quality improvement program launched in 2012 and was completed in 2021. Funded by Fairtrade and Organic premiums as well as through government funding and member contributions, the program helped successfully raise general overall cup scores to 85-86. To achieve this, they built drying houses, manual pulpers and fermentation tanks at all member farms and helped members plant higher-quality varieties.</span></p> <p></p> <p class="MsoNormal"><span lang="en-gb" xml:lang="en-gb">Coffee in Peru</span></p> <p></p> <p><span lang="en-gb" xml:lang="en-gb">Peru holds exceptional promise as a producer of high-quality coffees. The country is the largest exporter of organic Arabica coffee globally. With extremely high altitudes and fertile soils, the country’s smallholder farmers also produce some stunning specialty coffees.</span></p> <p></p> <p><span lang="en-gb" xml:lang="en-gb">Though coffee arrived in Peru in the 1700s, very little coffee was exported until the late 1800s. Until that point, most coffee produced in Peru was consumed locally. When coffee leaf rust hit Indonesia in the late 1800s, a country central to European coffee imports at the time, Europeans began searching elsewhere for their fix. Peru was a perfect option.</span></p> <p></p> <p><span lang="en-gb" xml:lang="en-gb">Between the late 1800s and the first World War, European interests invested significant resources into coffee production in Peru. However, with the advent of the two World Wars, England and other European powers became weakened and took a less colonialist perspective. When the British and other European land owners left, their land was purchased by the government and redistributed to locals. The Peruvian government repurchased the 2 million hectares previously granted to England and distributed the lands to thousands of local farmers. Many of these farmers later grew coffee on the lands they received.</span></p> <p></p> <p><span lang="en-gb" xml:lang="en-gb">Today, Peruvian coffee growers are overwhelmingly small scale. Farmers in Peru usually process their coffee on their own farms. Most coffee is Fully washed. Cherry is usually pulped, fermented and dried in the sun on raised beds or drying sheds. Drying greenhouses and parabolic beds are becoming more common as farmers pivot towards specialty markets.</span></p> <p></p> <p><span lang="en-gb" xml:lang="en-gb">After drying, coffee will then be sold in parchment to the cooperative. Producers who are not members of a cooperative will usually sell to a middleman.</span></p> <p></p> <p><span lang="en-gb" xml:lang="en-gb">The remoteness of farms combined with their small size means that producers need either middlemen or cooperatives to help get their coffee to market. Cooperative membership protects farmers greatly from exploitation and can make a huge difference to income from coffee. Nonetheless, currently only around 15-25% of smallholder farmers have joined a coop group. </span></p> <p></p> <p><!-- [if gte mso 9]><xml> <o:OfficeDocumentSettings> <o:AllowPNG/> </o:OfficeDocumentSettings> </xml><![endif]--><!-- [if gte mso 9]><xml> <w:WordDocument> <w:View>Normal</w:View> <w:Zoom>0</w:Zoom> <w:TrackMoves/> <w:TrackFormatting/> <w:HyphenationZone>21</w:HyphenationZone> <w:PunctuationKerning/> <w:ValidateAgainstSchemas/> <w:SaveIfXMLInvalid>false</w:SaveIfXMLInvalid> <w:IgnoreMixedContent>false</w:IgnoreMixedContent> <w:AlwaysShowPlaceholderText>false</w:AlwaysShowPlaceholderText> <w:DoNotPromoteQF/> <w:LidThemeOther>FR-BE</w:LidThemeOther> <w:LidThemeAsian>X-NONE</w:LidThemeAsian> <w:LidThemeComplexScript>X-NONE</w:LidThemeComplexScript> <w:Compatibility> <w:BreakWrappedTables/> <w:SnapToGridInCell/> <w:WrapTextWithPunct/> <w:UseAsianBreakRules/> <w:DontGrowAutofit/> <w:SplitPgBreakAndParaMark/> <w:EnableOpenTypeKerning/> <w:DontFlipMirrorIndents/> 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Price €7.64